Rants of a Sane Man

Concealed Carry: Wisconsin’s Joint Finance Committee Makes the Right Call

The Wisconsin legislature’s Joint Finance Committee approved recommendations to make Wisconsin the 49th state to approve the concealed carry of firearms.  The law would require those lawfully seeking to carry firearms concealed to receive training and to obtain permits.  Individuals over the age of 21—not prohibited from possessing firearms by either state or federal law—are eligible for permits. The law is a solid compromise.  Retired or long-serving law enforcement officers and those honorably discharged from the military may obtain waviers from the training portion of the bill.

State Senator Lena Taylor continues to demagogue the issue.  Taylor told Channel 4 News that persons who have domestic violence on their records would have access to permits.  Since she is an attorney, one has to assume that Senator Taylor knows the difference between a rap sheet and a record.  A rap sheet is list of arrests.  A record is a notation of criminal convictions.  An arrest, as far as the criminal justice system is concerned, means relatively little.  Annually, about 50 percent of those arrested in Wisconsin are not convicted of crimes.  There is a big difference between probable cause to affect an arrest and the proof beyond a reasonable doubt required to obtain a criminal conviction.  Moreover, persons convicted of acts of domestic violence are prohibited by the federal law from possessing firearms. As such, they are not eligible for concealed carry permits in Wisconsin. 

Shorewood Police Catch Undue Flack for Textbook High-Risk Traffic Stop

Tonight, Channel 4 News also featured a segment pertaining to the traffic stop of Shorewood High School track coach Dominic Newman.

Shorewood officers stopped Newman early Sunday morning after receiving a call of a possible stolen auto. As law enforcement training throughout the state dictates, the officers conducted a high-risk traffic stop. 

I viewed the dash cam video displayed on the newscast.  The Shorewood police officers did a textbook job of executing the stop. 

After Newman was placed in handcuffs and secured in the rear of a squad car, Shorewood officers investigated further and realized they had the wrong party.

“You have not my, but Shorewood Police Department’s sincerest apology,” said an officer on the dash cam’s video. “We don’t mean to embarrass you, but we have to check things out.”

The Shorewood police deserve a pat on the back, not flack from the media, for their display of true professionalism. 

After all, if the car had been stolen, did Mr. Newman actually expect the police to simply walk-up to the driver’s side window and ask for his license?

Watch Channel Four’s story regarding the stop of Mr. Newman by visiting:

http://www.todaystmj4.com/news/local/123584224.html

Could Weiner Get Whacked?  

Some residents of New York Congressman Anthony Weiner’s district believe lewd and crude online antics are a personal matter that should not preclude him from holding public office.  An alleged phone-sex conversation Weiner had with a woman, however, could result in his political demise.

After the alleged conversation ended, the woman called Weiner back at the number left on her caller ID.  The woman received a voice mail message indicating that the telephone number was for outgoing calls from members of the United States Congress. 

It is this alleged call, no doubt, that will cause congressional ethics committee members to look long-and-hard at Weiner’s use of government owned property for personal gratification.

Milwaukee-Based Crime Novel Surges at Amazon.com

Mitchell Nevin’s Milwaukee-based crime mystery, The Cozen Protocol, surged to #2 this week on Amazon.com’s list of criminal procedure books, reports a news release from the book’s publisher.

In mid-February, retired Milwaukee Police Department Captain Glenn Frankovis posted his book review of The Cozen Protocol here at the Spingola Files (see the below link): 

http://www.badgerwordsmith.com/spingolafiles/2011/02/09/retired-mpd-captain-reviews-milwaukee-based-crime-novel/

I have tipped-off more than a few media outlets about the this well researched novel.  With a few exceptions, it appears local news departments are content covering stories of dirty restaurants and bad, seasonable weather to explore a work some law enforcement veterans see as outstanding.  

Spingola Files’ Psychology of Homicide Ad Now Posted @ YouTube

Over the course of the past several months, I have traveled to various locales to present the Psychology of Homicide, a Spingola Files’ feature highlighting a few high profile investigations.

A new ad for this interesting event is now up-and-running at YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TF2kAvSSyU

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective.

If your organization is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files presentation The Psychology of Homicide.  For more information, visit http://www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2011

2 Responses

  1. Big Larry

    Spin, I like the short rants. Is this a new feature for the site? I’ve pretty much given up on the local Milwaukee television news. It really sucks. Sensatioinalized stories to grab ratings seems what they are interested in most. What about the new Milw. County exec selling out by extending labor contracts? Not a word. They could learn so much just reading The Cozen Protocol. The fictional television reporter could teach most of the folks from televison news a thing or two.

    June 10, 2011 at 10:15 pm

  2. Mike Massa

    Lena Taylor and my ex-wife are living proof that you don’t have to be smart to graduate from law school

    June 18, 2011 at 5:51 am

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