Archive for February, 2013

A Tale of One City

Cities become dysfunctional for a reason.  In some places, such as Chicago, the governing class has historically relied on political patronage; whereby, members of a specific ethnic or racial background are brought into the Democrat Party infrastructure with the belief that they can control the violence of competing criminal enterprises within their districts.

In Chicago, the Daley machine is dead. Just over a decade ago, President Bush, at the advice of a former U.S. Senator from Illinois, appointed Patrick Fitzgerald—an outsider from New York—as the U.S. Attorney for Northern Illinois.  Under Fitzgerald’s watch, federal officials indicated several high profile targets, including former Illinois Governors George Ryan and Rod Blagojevich, Chicago City Clerk James Laski, as well as a number of top aides to former Mayor Richard M. Daley.

Fitzgerald and federal law enforcement also targeted the hierarchy of Chicago’s street gangs, like the the New Breed—an off-shoot of the Black Disciples—and the Latin Kings, who employed police officers to shake down rivals.

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2011/11/18/chicago-cops-among-those-indicted-in-drug-conspiracy/

On the other hand, the Daley machine picked its own poison when it appointed Jody Weis as Chicago’s Police Superintendent in 2008. A former FBI agent, Weis chose to focus his wrath on his own officers while treating the criminal element with kid gloves.

Consequently, with top gang members occupying federal prison cells and Weis’ unwillingness to assert control, a power vacuum ensued, resulting in a number of smaller gangs going to war over lucrative drug turf. Last year, the homicide clearance rate in Chicago was just 33 percent, one of the lowest of any American city with a population over 500,000.

The following article by National Review’s Kevin Williamson gives readers a behind the scenes look at Chicago’s gangster subculture and why it is tearing that city apart.

https://www.nationalreview.com/nrd/articles/340053/gangsterville

Now, Chicago has turned to a new top-cop, Garry McCarthy, a former Newark, New Jersey, police chief and a former member of the NYPD command staff.  However, instead using a decentralized approach to crackdown on street gangs, McCarthy seems intent of carrying water for gun control advocates.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/isra-chicago-police-superintendent-mccarthy-crosses-the-line-191588711.html

Dysfunction breeds dysfunction, which, in urban areas, often stems from an overdose of political correctness.

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective. His latest book, Best of the Spingola Files, Vol. II: Here’s Looking at You, is available at Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Spingola-Files-Vol-ebook/dp/B00AGZTALE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354972268&sr=8-1&keywords=spingola+files

If your group is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files’ Psychology of Homicide presentation.  For more information, please visit:

www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2013


The Cop Against the Machine

Heimsness

Madison PD Officer Stephen Heimsness

The term “cozen”—meaning deception to win gain by shrewd trickery—is typically the antithesis of the word “noble,” although this rule of the English language might no longer apply in some quarters of our state’s capitol, where some seasoned law enforcement veterans believe Police Officer Stephen Heimsness is in the process of getting railroaded.

This leads one to wonder: is the Madison Police Department’s version of The Cozen Protocol being hatched inside the offices of its chief-of-police, Noble Wray, with his internal investigators playing the perfunctory roles of Bullpen Detectives John Spinelli and Bob Hillmeyer?

At 2:45 AM on November 9 of last year, Heimsness responded to a report of a possible entry in progress at a home on Madison’s isthmus. As he approached the residence, the officer observed the homeowner struggling with a man, later identified a Paul Heenan.  The intoxicated man then moved towards the officer and, according to Heimsness, Heenan reached for his gun.  The two men then began to grapple. Believing that the only reason an attacker would seek to disarm a police officer is to turn the gun against him, Heimsness fired three shots, killing Heenan.

Of course the residents of Madison are acting like the far-left residents that they are—a town that the late Wisconsin Gov. Lee Dreyfus once described as “Thirty-square miles surrounded by a sea of reality.” From the comfort of their coffee houses on Williamson and State Streets many Madisonians are now expert armchair cops, second-guessing Heimsness at every turn, even though they know that about one-in-ten police officers murdered each year are killed with their own firearms.

http://www.policeone.com/close-quarters-combat/articles/100228-Cases-of-Officers-Killed-by-Their-Own-Guns-Likely-Will-Not-Change-R-I-Policies/

Other former Madison officers active in liberal causes have also stalked the flames burning under Heimsness’ feet.  Cheri Maples, a former police captain who now serves as a Buddhist teacher, told the Wisconsin State Journal that while she was “…not in a position to question Officer Heimsness’ statement that he feared for his life, I sincerely believe few officers would have made the same choice in the same set of circumstances.”

After reading Maples’ quote, many current and former law enforcement officers are probably wondering if the former captain was ever in the same position as Heimsness—in a struggle with an intoxicated person reaching for her firearm? My guess is that she was not, which is why Maples used the third person when referencing what officers would do in the same circumstance.

My suggestion to both Maples and Wisconsin State Journal reporter Sandy Cullen is this: why not interview police officers who actually walked-a-mile in Heimsness’ shoes? In some instances, I recognize that this might be difficult to do, since many of them are now deceased.

Meanwhile, I believe, Madison’s police chief, Noble Wray, appears to want it both ways.  While he has steadfastly defended Heimsness’ actions in regards to the shooting, Wray, it seems, is beginning to buckle under the pressure brought to bear by the city’s left-wing political establishment.

On February 3, Wray announced that the Madison Police Department had opened three “new” investigations of Heimsness’ conduct unrelated to the shooting or to the use of force.

“Although these investigations are not complete,” Wray told the Wisconsin State Journal, “I find the preliminary information to be troubling.”

Whatever happened to the Madison Police Department’s policy of not commenting about ongoing internal investigations?

Moreover, negatively commenting on an internal investigation prior to its conclusion seems to run counter to civil service law.  Wisconsin State Statute 62.13(5)(em)3, states, that a police chief must “…before filing the charge against the subordinate, made a reasonable effort to discover whether the subordinate did in fact violate a rule or order.” How can the chief-of-police claim that he made a “reasonable effort” to substantiate a charge against an officer after he publicly claimed that “preliminary” information, absent all the facts, is “troubling”?

In preparation for this post, SF reached out to those who understand the internal politics of the Madison Police Department, as well as those that know Officer Heimsness. To a person, they had good things to say about Heimsness, although they also believed he is soon to fall victim to Madison’s version of The Cozen Protocol.  

When asked if the Madison PD was collecting dirt so they can threaten Officer Heimsness with the loss of his job and force him to resign, one officer replied, “You are right on. Things are not good.”

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective. His latest book, Best of the Spingola Files, Vol. II: Here’s Looking at You, is available at Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Spingola-Files-Vol-ebook/dp/B00AGZTALE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354972268&sr=8-1&keywords=spingola+files

If your group is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files’ Psychology of Homicide presentation.  For more information, please visit:

www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2013


Sign the Spingola Files’ Online Petition Regulating Drones in Wisconsin

The Spingola Files is circulating an online petition asking Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker to take executive action to restrict the use of Unmanned Ariel Vehicles (UAV’s), a.k.a. drones, in Wisconsin.

If you’re the type of American who enjoys freedom and liberty and despises totalitarianism, this petition speaks directly to you.

http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/restrict-wisconsin-drone-surveillance.html

© Steve Spingola, Wales, WI 2013


Wisc. State Representative: No Need to Address Drones Right Now

Late last week, SF encouraged its readers to contact their state representatives in an effort to regulate the use of drones in Wisconsin.

One such reader recently received a reply from state Rep. Chris Kapenga, an assemblyman from the 99th District in Waukesha County’s lake country area, concerning drone deployment.

“I will continue to monitor this situation at a state level,” Kapenga replied, “but do not currently feel the need to address this issue in Wisconsin,” even though the reader forwarded this video of ARGIS—a new camera that provides totalitarian surviellance over a 15-mile radius—to Rep. Kapenga.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=QGxNyaXfJsA

This is the kind of technology the KGB and the East German Stasi could only dream of.  Unfortunately, unless our state and federal lawmakers have the willingness to stand-up and say ‘No’ to the drone lobby’s special interest donations and/or to the overzealous, big brother-wing of law enforcement,  our freedoms, as we know them now, will soon vanish.

Please feel free to forward any correspondence received from elected officials concerning Unmanned Ariel Vehicles (UAVs, a.k.a. drones) to me.  SF will note the responses herein and maintain a tally sheet to determine which politicians support freedom or a Soviet-style surveillance state.

The Dorner Deal

Yesterday, I appeared on Today’s TMJ4 news to discuss the demise of Christopher Dorner, the former Los Angeles police officer gone rogue.  To watch the video, please visit:

http://www.todaystmj4.com/news/local/191143631.html

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective. His latest book, Best of the Spingola Files, Vol. II: Here’s Looking at You, is available at Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Spingola-Files-Vol-ebook/dp/B00AGZTALE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354972268&sr=8-1&keywords=spingola+files

If your group is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files’ Psychology of Homicide presentation.  For more information, please visit:

www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2013


Just Say ‘No’ to High-Tech Drone Surveillance

This comes to us courtesy of a friend of SF, liberty activist Kaye Beach. Please take a few minutes to watch his video about ARGIS—a drone surveillance system that enables 24/7 surveillance of 15 square miles of any city with the data retained and stored for up to 10 years.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=QGxNyaXfJsA

This technology is scary. If our state legislatures do not get onboard and prohibit drone surveillance absent a court order, freedom, as we know it in America, will die on the vine.

When speaking about the intrusive nature of high-technology, I have noticed that some of those present seem to shrug their heads as if to say, ‘It is here and there is nothing we can do about it.’

Americans should never concede their liberties to the world depicted in Orwell’s novel 1984.

In Olmsted et al vs. the United States (1928), the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that wiretapping, absent a court order, was perfectly legal. Why? Because the court determined that telephone companies actually owned the lines, which meant that the renters of the lines—those who used the telephone—did not have a reasonable expectation of privacy.

http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=5577544660194763070&hl=en&as_sdt=2&as_vis=1&oi=scholarr

Since conversations of a very personal nature occur over telephone lines, Americans demanded that Congress act to protect their privacy from unwarranted government intrusion. In response, the Communications Act of 1934—landmark legislation that prohibited wiretapping of any kind absent a court order—became the law of the land.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Act_of_1934

Now is the time to get on the horn and call your state and federal representatives to demand that legislation restricting the use of drones be propose and passed.

So far, only one American city, Charlottesville, Virginia, has prohibited the use of Unmanned Ariel Aircraft absent a court order or exigent circumstances.

https://www.rutherford.org/publications_resources/on_the_front_lines/relying_on_rutherford_institute_model_resolution_charlottesville_becomes_fi

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective. His latest book, Best of the Spingola Files, Vol. II: Here’s Looking at You, is available at Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Spingola-Files-Vol-ebook/dp/B00AGZTALE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354972268&sr=8-1&keywords=spingola+files

If your group is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files’ Psychology of Homicide presentation.  For more information, please visit:

www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2013


Rogue Former LAPD Cop has Paul Bunyan-Sized Axe-to-Grind

In law enforcement circles it is common to hear that a suspect has told friends, relatives, and/or accomplices that, “I’ll never be taken alive.” In reality, though, it is usually just tough-talk.  Criminals love to talk-the-talk of John Gotti or Tony Montana—the fictional Cuban cutthroat in the 1983 movie Scareface; rarely, however, do they walk-the-walk.  Fortunately, for officers working the streets, the fear of death serves as a powerful deterrent.

What sends law enforcement into a frenzy is a well-trained killer with nothing to lose, like Christopher Dorner, the former Los Angeles Police Department cop gone rogue.  More than 100 tactically trained officers turned their attention to mountains surrounding Bear Lake, California, on Thursday, where Dorner’s vehicle was found burning.

Last Sunday, police allege that Dorner murdered Monica Quan and her boyfriend, Keith Lawrence, in a condominium parking garage in the Los Angeles suburb of Irvine. Quan is the daughter of a retired LAPD captain turned attorney, who had represented Dorner during an appeal of his termination for providing false statements to internal investigators. According to a manifesto he authored, Dorner believes that the attorney did not act as his advocate, and, instead, failed to attack the jaundiced evidence used against him.

From prior experience, it is not unusual for an accused officer to allege that internal investigators embellished statements, twisted facts, or conveniently omitted exculpatory information. In most law enforcement agencies, the commander of an internal affairs unit reports directly to the chief-of-police. Hence, some believe that the outcomes of high-profile internal investigations are pre-determined by the chief; whereby, the chief’s henchmen construe the facts necessary to make a square peg fit into a round hole.  This pre-ordained outcome is then rubber stamped by the chief-of-police, who self-rationalizes this lack of institutional integrity as the ends justifying means.

Without knowing all the facts, a hunch says that Dorner’s beef with the LAPD stems directly from the aforementioned scenario. Three days prior to the homicides of Quan and Lawrence, The Huffington Post reports that CNN’s Anderson Cooper received a coin, given away by former LAPD Police Chief William Bratton, with bullet holes that read, “I never lied.”

Unlike the usual criminal suspects, most of whom lack the knowledge or willingness to walk-the-walk, Dorner’s Rambo-like credentials and his apparent alacrity to die are enough to cause the hair on the back on any cop’s neck to stand upright.

The Guardian notes that Clint Grimes, a former “navy comrade,” described the marksman Dorner as “friendly, bright and technologically savvy…They’re not looking for a stupid guy, here.”

So where is Christopher Dorner now?

Reports suggest that there are hundreds of cabins in the area where Dorner’s vehicle was found. With the snow and frigid cold descending on the Bear Lake area, Dorner certainly will take shelter. Having knowledge of police and military tactics, he likely knows that, once the snow clears, the police will use infrared equipped helicopters and drones to locate a single individual isolated in a remote location.  This leads me to believe that, if he is not already dead, Dorner might do one of two things: forcibly enter a cabin occupied by others or procure a vehicle.

Reading between the lines, law enforcement is concerned that Dorner might make use of improvised explosives.  This is likely why investigators scoured his mother’s residence and sifted through the garbage.

Hopefully, the manhunt will come to an end peacefully, although the proverbial writing on the wall points to a tragic ending.

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective. His latest book, Best of the Spingola Files, Vol. II: Here’s Looking at You, is available at Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Spingola-Files-Vol-ebook/dp/B00AGZTALE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354972268&sr=8-1&keywords=spingola+files

If your group is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files’ Psychology of Homicide presentation.  For more information, please visit:

www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2013