Posts tagged “Chicago police

SF Update: White House Moves G-8 Summit from Chicago to Camp David

In SF’S last post, As G-8 Summit Nears, Chicago is on the Hot Seat, I indicated that even though Chicago is just 50 miles to the south, “many residents of southeastern Wisconsin are oblivious to the costs and dangers associated with the event’s security issues.”

Just minutes ago, the White House announced that it would relocate the 2012 G-8 Summit from Chicago to Camp David. The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office “did not ask the White House to take the more controversial of the two summits off Chicago’s hands.”[1]

Reading between the lines, I believe there are two possible reasons for the move. Illinois state government and, to a lesser extent the City of Chicago, are in bad shape financially.  The price tag for the G-8’s security would easy top $500 million. It also appeared as if the Chicago Police Department’s administration did not have a full staffing plan in place.  The second reason is a possible security threat—not yet known publicly—that might have triggered the White House to hold the event at Camp David, a facility housed on the Naval Support Facility Thurmont, a secure military installation.

SADLY, ANOTHER DEATH BY DRINKING & DROWNING AT A WISCONSIN STATE COLLEGE

In my new book, Best of the Spingola Files, Vol. I., I profiled the drowning deaths of several young men in La Crosse, Wisconsin.  Some have suspected that a serial killer is responsible.  I went ever further, listing a high-ranking officer—Captain Morgan—as the suspect.

In early January, 21-year-old Michael Philbin, the son of former Green Bay Packer’s Offensive Coordinator Joe Philbin, drowned in the Fox River just blocks away from the University of Wisconsin—Oshkosh campus. 

Earlier today, searchers discovered the body of 21-year-old UW-Stevens Point student Eric Duffey in the Wisconsin River.  “Police say he left Joe’s Bar on Main Street and headed for home,” television station WEAU in Eau Claire reports.  “He [Duffy] lives just blocks away on the 700 block of Isadore Street.”[2]

If you are a parent of college-aged child, and if your son or daughter will not listen to your advice, please have them read this earlier post from SF:

http://www.badgerwordsmith.com/spingolafiles/2011/08/27/leaving-for-college-take-some-common-sense-with-you/

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective. His new book, Best of the Spingola Files, is now available at Amazon.com.

If your group is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files Psychology of Homicide presentation.  For more information, visit www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2012 


 [1] Pallasch, A. “White House Moves G-8 Summit from Chicago to Camp David.” Suntimes.com.  March 5, 2012.  5 March 2012.  http://www.suntimes.com/news/11082594-418/white-house-moves-g-8-summit-from-chicago-to-camp-david.html

 [2]“Update: Body Found ID’d as Missing College Student.” WEAU.com. March 5, 2012. 5 March 2012. http://www.weau.com/home/headlines/Police_search_for_missing_UW-Stevens_Point_student_141367593.html


Murder by the Numbers

Some homicide numbers from 2006 to 2011 spotlight things worth noting.

If you are a killer and want to get away with murder, you may want to set-up shop in Chicago.  WBBM radio reports that the Windy City’s homicide clearance rate was just 30 percent in 2011. If you think this number is horrific, it is a seven percent improvement from 2010, when investigators cleared only 28 percent of Chicago murders.

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2012/01/25/only-30-percent-of-last-years-murders-have-been-solved/

A cynic might claim that Chicago’s homicide clearance rate has declined as a direct result of a mandate requiring videotaped confessions.  SF’s post concerning former Chicago PD police commander Jon Burge’s interrogation techniques might, in part, explain the significant drop in clearance rates there—down from 80 percent in 1991.

http://www.badgerwordsmith.com/spingolafiles/2011/01/23/bag-man-a-portrait-of-illinois-justice-system/

The city of Milwaukee reported 84 homicides in 2011. Sources claim the clearance rate was near 70 percent, which means 26 killers remain at-large to reoffend.  From 1990-1999, Milwaukee homicides claimed the lives of 1,432—an average of 143.2 a year.

http://www.knoxnews.com/data/murder-knoxville-nation/

Milwaukee’s homicide clearance rate from 1990-1999 was an astonishing 84 percent, which meant, on average, 23 killers remained at large in any given year.  As such, even though Milwaukee’s homicide rate per capita has declined, the number of killers at large in 2011 compared to the average in the 1990s has increased 13 percent.

To get an idea how Milwaukee homicides stack-up, no pun intended, against other areas of Wisconsin consider these numbers as the concealed carry permits arrive in the mail:

  • In 2008, Milwaukee County experienced 74 homicides, causing public officials to laud the decrease. 
  • In 2008, Dane County’s homicide rate soared to 11—a 63.5 percent increase from 2006.   
  • These 2008 numbers indicate that a Milwaukee County resident is 330 percent more likely to fall victim to homicide than one in Dane County.  
  • In 2008, the total numbers of homicides in Eau Claire, Brown, Washington, Waukesha, Qzaukee, and Sheboygan counties totaled just nine.  
  • In 2008, Milwaukee comprised 11.6 percent of Wisconsin’s population, but accounted for 48.6 percent of the state’s homicides.  

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Steve Spingola is an author and retired Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective.

If your group is in need of a fascinating guest speaker, consider the Spingola Files Psychology of Homicide presentation.  For more information, visit www.badgerwordsmith.com/the_psychology_of_homicide_presentation.html

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2012


In Chicago, Tripe Springs Eternal

If there is any wonder why gang violence threatens the stability of the city of Chicago, all one needs to do is read a handful of blogs emanating from the windy city’s politically charged, open mayoral race environment, where even the deaths of police officers have resulted in a hue-and-cry from the usual suspects. 

One such grammatically challenged and punctuation error-filled blog, published by Mark Sallen, an associate editor of the South Street Journal, highlights the problem. 

In a post entitled, “Why the Silence on Police and Media Updates on the Killing of Chicago Police Officer David Blake,” Sallen suggests that Chicago Police Superintendent Jody Weis and his detectives are prioritizing the homicide investigations of police officers based on race. 

Last month, killers took the lives of two Chicago Police Department veterans—Evidence Technician Michael Flist, who is white, and Police Officer David Blake, who is African-American. 

Off-duty at the time, Blake was shot-and-killed while smoking a cigarette in his SUV along a secluded, one-block street. A gunman murdered Flisk, an on-duty forensic specialist, in an alley during the investigation of a garage burglary.   

Last week, Chicago police arrested a convicted felon in connection with Flisk’s murder. Timothy Herring, Jr., a 19-year-old parolee on electronic monitoring for a 2007 armed robbery conviction, allegedly gunned-down Flisk and former Chicago Housing Authority Police Officer Stephen Peters.  

The homicide of Officer David Blake, however, remains open, as detectives piece together the sketchy details of what transpired inside the off-duty officer’s SUV. 

In his blog post, Sallen notes that “anonymous sources” tell him that there are “personal issues” involved in Blake’s death. 

“On the day of Officer Blakes killing,” Sallen writes, “I ran to the scene for it was on the other end our our Seipp Street block and I seen various neighbors looking out the windows as officers began to assemble at the scene, but NONE of these neighbors were questioned by Detectives after the rumor was that a man left the scene running down our block in a Black hat as to whether anyone on the block may have seen anyone.”

So poorly constructed is this sentence that it is difficult to comprehend that Sallen is an actual editor of anything written in the English language. However, how would Sallen know whom the police had interviewed?  After all, the good money says that neighbors providing details of a cold-blooded murder to detectives might be reluctant to give interviews to Sallen, a publisher of a newspaper and an individual lending street creditability to Wallace “Gator” Bradley. 

According to Sallen’s post, Bradley, of United for Peace—an outfit closely associated with the nefarious Gangster Disciples street gang and their imprisoned leader, Larry Hoover—is one of the community organizers “who were thinking out loud when they asked the question of whether it was wrong to think that the killing of a White Police Officer on The East Side got public 24/7 coverage and the killing of Black Officer David Blake does not see Weis doing public briefing after briefing and his personal commitment to using every resource of the police department to see that this case is resolved?”

Readers of the Spingola Files are keenly aware that SF is no fan of Jody Weis. It is, however, these so-called activists—the Sallens and Bradleys advocating and publishing such drivel—that have poisoned the well of cooperation in Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods. The type of demagoguery contained in Sallen’s post simply builds walls of distrust between the police and the community.  

While Sallen’s post did little besides butcher the English language, Chicago detectives are painstakingly reconstructing the last 24 hours of David Blake’s life. Without a doubt, Blake’s cellular telephone records—text messages, incoming and outgoing calls, GPS identifiers and tower pings—may provide investigators with significant clues, as it is apparent that Blake likely knew his killer.

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Steven Spingola is a former Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective and the the author of The Killer in Our Midst: the Case of Milwaukee’s North Side Strangler and Predators on the Parkway: a Former Homicide Detective Explores the Colonial Parkway Murders.  Spingola also presents The Psychology of Homicide, a riveting program concerning high-profile homicide investigations, to groups and organizations.

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2010


Chicago PD Reels as Officer Deaths Climb

Chicago police are under fire—literally. 

By all barometers, it has been a horrific week for those in blue just 100 miles to the southeast of Spingola Files HQ. 

Last Monday, off-duty Officer David Blake was shot and killed on that city’s southwest side. 

Earlier today, a gunman killed an on-duty Chicago police evidence technician and a former Chicago Housing Authority officer. 

While investigators are busy probing both matters, they have yet to ascertain a motive in the killing of Blake, a 15-year veteran who died in his SUV with a cigarette still dangling from his mouth.  The evidence strongly suggests that the perpetrator shot Blake while both were inside the vehicle. Robbery is apparently not a motive.  Blake’s wallet was located on his person.  Detectives also found his duty weapon inside the SUV. 

Blake resided a distance from the West Seipp Street crime scene—a one-block road described by an area resident as lightly traveled and not an area where people typically go to congregate.

As detectives worked diligently to clear the Blake case, another tragedy unfolded. 

Earlier today, Officer Michael Flisk, age 46, was shot and killed while investigating a burglary on Chicago’s south side. 

“News of Flisk’s slaying set the department reeling,” the Chicago Tribune reports, “leaving officers crying in the cold night outside the Cook County morgue…” 

A father of four children, Flisk was the sixth Chicago police officer killed in 2010. 

Police officials report that Flisk was dispatched to the 8100 block of S. Burnham Avenue to investigate a burglary, which was reported around noon.  Upon arrival, the evidence technician met Stephen Peters, a former officer with the Chicago Housing Authority, who had reported a garage entry.  Around 1:30 p.m., witnesses heard gunshots.  When back-up officers arrived, they found Flisk and Peters dead in an alley. 

“There hasn’t been a year this bad since the 1960s,” Mark Donahue, the President of Chicago’s Fraternal Order of Police, told the Chicago Tribune.

Even though the details of these three slayings remain imprecise, it is clear that Chicago crime is out of control.  In a recent interview with WBBM radio, former Illinois Governor Jim Thompson noted that suppressing the windy city’s ever expanding gang problem  is likely the number one issue in the upcoming Chicago mayoral election. 

But how many officers must die before Chicago’s political leaders decide to take the gloves off? 

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Steven Spingola is a former Milwaukee Police Department homicide detective and the the author of Predators on the Parkway: a Former Homicide Detective Explores the Colonial Parkway Murders.  Spingola also travels to present The Psychology of Homicide, a riveting program concerning high-profile homicide investigations, to groups and organizations.

© Steven Spingola, Wales, WI, 2010